The Lynn Brand

Brand tone of voice

Agile

means that we are swift. So our language is clear, simple and to the point. Cut words that don’t add meaning. And cut out meanings that your audience doesn’t need or understand.

Forward-looking

means that we are at the forefront of change. So our style is active. Use short sentences and active verbs.

Student-centric

means people come first, ahead of systems, technology or bureaucracy. So our language is transparent. Don’t use jargon or acronyms and initials. Use technical terms only if our audience is familiar with them.

Well-placed

means we are in a fiercely competitive and high-profile market. So we must be first-rate all the time. Our grammar, use of words, punctuation and presentation must be impeccable.

Dedicated

means our involvement with Lynn University is intense and personal. So we’re enthusiastic when we talk or write.

Agile

means that we are swift. So our language is clear, simple and to the point. Cut words that don’t add meaning. And cut out meanings that your audience doesn’t need.

Other tips:
Use shorter rather than longer words or phrases.

Instead of … Say …
accordinglyso
residelive
utilizeuse
discontinuestop
facilitatehelp, ease
for the purpose ofto
in the event thatif
in the near futuresoon
with regard toabout

Avoid qualifiers like “somewhat,” “quite” or “very”; these words dilute your message.

Where practical, use bullet points instead of long sentences or paragraphs.

Old way

Lynn plans to expand to the MBA program, in part, due to the fact that the university’s new LEED-certified International Business Center (IBC), home of its College of Business and Management, will feature design elements focused on collaborative work spaces and integrating technology into the learning experience. This learning environment works well with the Apple ecosystem that focuses on collaborative learning and flipping the classroom.

New way

Bringing mobile devices into the classroom has changed the way Lynn is designing its campus. The university’s new LEED-certified International Business Center will feature collaborative workspaces that integrate technology into the learning experience.

Forward-looking

means that we are at the forefront of change. So our style is active. Use short sentences and active verbs. Say “we improved” rather than “performance was improved.”

Other tips:

  • Avoid beginning a sentence with “there is” or “there are.” Doing so hides the subject and uses a weaker linking verb instead of an active verb.

    instead of: There are many students at Lynn who prefer iBooks over traditional textbooks.

    say: Many Lynn students prefer iBooks over traditional textbooks.
  • Avoid too many “-tion” words.

    instead of: She gave a demonstration of the new software.

    say: She demonstrated the new software.

Old way

One of the most extensive tablet-based learning efforts in all of American higher education rolled out on Aug. 25, 2013, when faculty and staff handed out more than 600 iPad minis to incoming students. The tablets use Apple technology to deliver the university’s nationally praised core curriculum and greatly enhance students’ learning experience through curriculum custom enhanced by faculty with multimedia content—replacing traditional textbooks with e-Books created by Lynn faculty and saving students hundreds of dollars on hard copy materials.

New way

Lynn’s iPad program is one of the most extensive in the country. The university provides a transformational learning device to its students and empowers faculty to more creatively deliver the core curriculum. Students save up to 50 percent off the cost of their textbooks thanks to Lynn’s highly interactive iBooks.

Student-centric

means people come first, ahead of systems, technology or bureaucracy. So our language is transparent. Don’t use jargon or acronyms and initials. Use technical terms only if our audience is familiar with them.

Keeping people first also means writing with your audience in mind. Are your readers high school seniors? Donors? Lynn alumni? Parents of current students? Tailor your tone and word choice to them. Don’t be afraid to address readers directly. Use “you,” “I,” “we,” “us” and “our” to make your writing more personal.

Example:
(from a Lynn Magazine story about the Dialogues of Learning core curriculum written for an alumni audience)

Remember the required courses you took in college—English 101, college algebra, Biology 101 and the like? Chances are, you got through them by doing a lot of memorization and along the way, you wondered, “Why do I have to take this class? When will I ever use or need it?”

Old way

Following the 2013 J-Term Citizenship Project course, a Global Perspective Inventory was administered at both the beginning and end of the course. The results were divided into two groups: classes that used the CBL methodology with an iPad and classes that were taught in the traditional manner without any embedded technology. In all cases, classes using the CBL methodology with iPads showed a higher level of improvement over the traditionally taught classes with no embedded technology.

New way

In January 2013, Lynn University conducted a successful pilot during its January Term Citizenship course. The result: iPad enriched classes showed a significantly higher level of learning than traditional classes.

Well-placed

means we are in a fiercely competitive and high-profile market. So we must be first-rate all the time. Our grammar, use of words, punctuation and presentation must be impeccable.

In written communication, Lynn University follows the Associated Press Stylebook and its accepted reference sources. We cover exceptions and Lynn-specific items in our custom stylebook, Lynn University Editorial Style Guide. You’ll find this guide on myLynn, or if you’re one of Lynn’s registered users of AP Stylebook online, you’ll find our guide in the “Custom Stylebook” section. Lynn’s AP Stylebook online site license permits a limited number of users. To subscribe or for more information, contact Liz McKey, editorial director, 561-237-7876 or lmckey@lynn.edu.

We cover the most frequently asked style questions in a shortened version titled Lynn Style at a Glance, which also can be found on myLynn.

Examples
Here are sample entries from the Lynn style guide:

alum, alumna, alumnae, alumnus, alumni
“Alum” is an informal expression for “alumnus” or “alumna.” Avoid this expression in formal copy. “Alumna” is singular for female graduate; “alumnae” is plural referring to only female graduates. “Alumnus” is singular for male graduate. “Alumni” is plural for the combination of male and female graduates or male graduates.

acronyms are words formed from the initial letters of phrases. Take care to avoid repetition of the last word of the original phrase.

Example: Use “PIN,” not “PIN number.” “PIN” is an acronym for “personal identification number.”

Other examples with unnecessary repetition: ATM machine, HIV virus, ISBN number, LCD display, SAT test, PDF format

Dedicated

means our involvement with Lynn University is intense and personal. So we’re enthusiastic when we talk or write. But that doesn’t mean everything needs an exclamation mark. We are a serious institution that touches a vital area of people’s lives, so our tone should reflect that.

Old way

Students will be taught by a faculty who enjoys teaching and who have experience in computer graphics, photography, graphic design, illustration and the fine arts.

New way

You’ll learn from the best. Our teachers have made names for themselves in computer graphics, photography, graphic design, illustration and the fine arts. Not only that, they’re passionate about teaching.